The Name of the Wind novel by Patrick Rothfuss

The Name of the Wind  is a fantasy novel by Patrick Rothfuss, the first book in a series called The Kingkiller Chronicle. It was published in 2007 . …

Rothfuss wrote The Name of the Wind during his nine-year advance toward his B.S. in English. …

I listened to the audio version by Nick Podehl. He’s excellent. And the book is very well written. Rothfuss is a masterful story teller. 

His protagonist is Kvothe:

You may have heard of me.

So begins the tale of Kvothe—from his childhood in a troupe of traveling players, to years spent as a near-feral orphan in a crime-riddled city, to his daringly brazen yet successful bid to enter a difficult and dangerous school of magic. In these pages you will come to know Kvothe as a notorious magician, an accomplished thief, a masterful musician, and an infamous assassin. But The Name of the Wind is so much more—for the story it tells reveals the truth behind Kvothe’s legend.

“The originality of Rothfuss’s outstanding debut fantasy, the first of a trilogy, lies less in its unnamed imaginary world than in its precise execution…As absorbing on a second reading as it is on the first, this is the type of assured, rich first novel most writers can only dream of producing. The fantasy world has a new star.” (Publishers Weekly, Starred Review)

“New fantasy authors are usually overhyped, and it’s rare to find one who writes with such assurance and narrative skill right from the start. I was reminded of Ursula LeGuin, George R. R. Martin, and J. R. R. Tolkien, but never felt that Rothfuss was imitating anyone. Like the writers he clearly admires, he’s an old-fashioned storyteller working with traditional elements, but his voice is his own. I haven’t been so gripped by a new fantasy series in years. It’s certain to become a classic.” (Lisa Tuttle, The Times)

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“Waterside is where people are poor. That make them beggars, thieves, and whores. Hillside is where people are rich. That makes them solicitors, politicians, and courtesans.”-p160

Presbyformed review

I’ve already downloaded the second book in the series — The Wise Man’s Fear (43 hours)

There have been rumours of a Movie and TV version.

Fifty Places to Bike Before You Die

I downloaded Fifty Places to Bike Before You Die by Chris Santella from the library.

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It’s not nearly as good as the title might suggest. And wasn’t what I was looking for.

I want to know the best cycle touring routes with the LEAST traffic. Santella’s book is not that.

But I did add a few of their recommended cycling destinations to my life list:

  • Icefields Parkway Banff Jasper
  • North Rim Grand Canyon
  • Natchez Trace  (Natchez, Mississippi to Nashville, Tennessee)
  • Crater Lake, Oregon
  • Mickelson Trail out of Rapid City, South Dakota
  • White Rim Trail out of Moab, Utah

Texas hill country cycling out of Austin or San Antonio sounds great too.

Chief Inspector Armand Gamache books

Friends recommended a series of books by Canadian author Louise Penny.

Still Life is the debut novel in the series and introduces the character Chief Inspector Armad Gamache. …

… one of the beloved residents, Miss Jane Neal, was shot in the heart with an arrow. Neal is an archery enthusiast and retired school teacher and Gamache must investigate to solve the murder. …

This book was adapted as a 2013 film starring Nathaniel Parker as Gamache.

still-life It’s excellent. I’ll definitely be continuing on to book 2.

The novels are set in the province of Quebec but feature many hallmarks of the British whodunit genre, including murders by unconventional means, bucolic villages, large casts of suspects, red herrings, and a dramatic disclosure of the murderer in the last few pages of the book.

In 2009, Penny helped to launch a new award for aspiring Canadian mystery writers, the Unhanged Arthur for Best Unpublished First Novel.

Penny currently lives in Knowlton, a small village in Quebec’s Eastern Townships about 100 km from Montreal.

The Thousandth Floor by Katharine McGee

For some reason I downloaded this young-adult, chick-lit book.

It really wasn’t for me.

One hundred years in the future, New York City’s skyline has been dramatically altered by the addition of a 1,000-story tower. The wealthy dwell in the upmost levels, while those who support the infrastructure of the tower live below.

The book opens with an unidentified young woman plunging to her death from the penthouse. The remainder of the title flashes back two months and follows the points of view of five teens. …

Amazon

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It’s juvenile. But I did enjoy some of the science fiction elements.

The Devil in the White City

Murder, Magic, and Madness at the Fair That Changed America

The Devil in the White City (2003) by Erik Larson was recommended to me by Ron & Kate.

It’s an incredible read. The truth truly is stranger than fiction. I highly recommend it. 

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The book is based on real characters and events. Leonardo DiCaprio purchased the film rights in 2010. …

The book is set in Chicago in 1893, intertwining the true tales of Daniel H. Burnham, the architect behind the 1893 World’s Fair, and Dr. H. H. Holmes, the serial killer who lured his victims to their deaths in his elaborately constructed “Murder Castle.” …

Serial killer Dr. Henry Howard Holmes
Serial killer Dr. Henry Howard Holmes

 

 

Tricky Business by Dave Barry

Carl Hiaasen and Dave Barry have made careers out of making fun of Florida.

Dave Barry’s 2016 book is — surprisingly — …

Best. State. Ever.: A Florida Man Defends His Homeland

For some reason I ended up reading, instead, classic Barry from 2002.

tricky-business

The Extravaganza of the Seas is a five-thousand-ton cash cow, a top-heavy tub whose sole function is to carry gamblers three miles from the Florida coast, take their money, then bring them back so they can find more money.

In the middle of a tropical storm one night, these characters are among the passengers it carries: Fay Benton, a single mom and cocktail waitress desperate for something to go right for once; Johnny and the Contusions, a ship’s band with so little talent they are . . . well, the ship’s band; Arnold and Phil, two refugees from the Beaux Arts Senior Center; Lou Tarant, a wide, bald man who has killed nine people, though none recently; and an assortment of uglies whose job it is to facilitate the ship’s true business, which is money-laundering or drug-smuggling or . . . something. …

Good Reads

Best was the subplot regarding the news team following the storm. 🙂

Daniel Silva – Portrait of a Spy

The 11th title in the Gabriel Allon series is my favourite, so far.

While enjoying a day in London with his wife, antiterrorist expert Gabriel Allon spots a man he believes to be a suicide bomber and follows him into Covent Garden. Alas, undercover police knock him down before he can intervene, and carnage ensues. Afterward, the CIA asks Gabriel to track down an American-born cleric now setting himself up as a rival to Osama bin Laden. …

Barnes and Noble

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