Happy Diwali

As I like Nepal in November, I’ve been here for the Diwali festival a number of times. Even Buddhists celebrate a version.

On day 2 dogs are fancied up. Other days it’s crows and holy cows.

Families clean, renovate, and decorate their homes in advance of the holiday.

The main purpose is to invite Lakshmi – the Goddess of Wealth – to visit their homes and bless them for the coming year.

oil lamp or diya with crackers, sweet or mithai, dry fruits, indian currency notes, marigold flower and statue of Goddess Laxmi on diwali night

Nepalis illuminate the interior and exterior of their homes with diyas (oil lamps or candles), electric lights, and offer puja (worship).

Family gets together for feasts. Many goats are slaughtered.

Diwali is expensive!

The highest quality goat come from high up in the Himalaya. We felt honoured to have the chance to buy dried, smoked, spicy Mustang goat.

They call it Sukuti. The tastiest thing I’d eaten so far in Nepal.

Groups of children arrive at your door singing and dancing for money. It’s a bit like Halloween.

Adults arrive doing the same, but they will be collecting money for local charitable causes.

Diwali also known as Deepavali and the “festival of lights“, is an ancient Hindu festival celebrated in autumn every year.

The festival spiritually signifies the victory of light over darkness, knowledge over ignorance, good over evil, and hope over despair.

The festival preparations and rituals typically extend over a five day period, but the main festival night of Diwali coincides with the darkest, new moon night of the Hindu Lunisolar month Kartika. …

Tonight. 🙂

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Rick Mc

Career gymnastics coach who loves the outdoors, and the internet.

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