Apple should reinvent Higher Education

Apple has tons of cash on hand. Is looking to revolutionize future products and services.

Professor Scott Galloway:

I teach 120 kids on Tuesday nights in my Brand Strategy course. That’s $720K, or $60K per class, in tuition payments, a lot of it financed with debt. I’m good at what I do, but walking in each night I remind myself we (NYU) are charging kids $500/minute for me and a projector. This. Is. Fucking. Ridiculous. …

Apple could change this. With a brand rooted in education, and a cash hoard to purchase Khan Academy’s and physical campuses (the future of education will be a mix of off- and on-line), Apple could break the cartel that masquerades as a social good but is really a caste system.

The focus should be creativity — design, humanities, art, journalism, etc. As the world rushes to STEM, the future belongs to the creative class, who can envision form, function, and people as something more — beautiful and inspiring. …

No Mercy. No Malice. (2017)

Advertisements

The Four by Scott Galloway

Four American companies have totally changed our lives.

Apple
Amazon
Google
Facebook

I use all four non-stop. Fantastic innovation.

Needless to say, there are downsides. Google no longer uses the mantra “don’t be evil”. They dropped it in 2018.

Scott Galloway has replaced Leo Laporte as my main tech guru. I just finished his book …

The Four: The Hidden DNA of Amazon, Apple, Facebook, and Google (2017)

It’s great, but you can get a good summary by reading Galloway’s article in Esquire:

Silicon Valley’s Tax-Avoiding, Job-Killing, Soul-Sucking Machine (2018)

The Year of Less by Cait Flanders

Needless to say, I was attracted to this book because of my own philosophy of Voluntary Simplicity.

Less is more.

Cait was quite a normal person. In debt, like normal people. Her life cluttered with possessions she never used, like normal people.

How I Stopped Shopping, Gave Away My Belongings, and Discovered Life Is Worth More Than Anything You Can Buy in a Store

When Cait Flanders was in her early 20s, she found herself $23,000 in consumer debt. In order to turn her life around — and get out of debt — she set out on a mission to address some of the root causes of her over-consumption.

Flanders’ memoir, The Year of Less, documents how through a self-imposed shopping ban, cutting back on eating out and drinking and de-cluttering her life, she rediscovered happiness, health and financial security.

In her own words, Flanders explains how she changed her life and wrote The Year of Less. …

CBC

Amazon

Are you buying meatless meat?

Cows belch methane. They are a bigger environmental problem than pigs or chicken for that reason.

Personally I’m trying to eat less beef.  When the meatless meat came along, I rushed to try as many of those products as possible. There are two main companies out of the USA, so far.

      1. Beyond Meat
      2. Impossible Foods

So far I’m not buying their products in preference to meat. The meatless meats I’ve tried are equally good or worse, are more expensive, and are not much more healthy.

I’ll keep trying. Both companies are still changing their products to better compete. Both are now very well funded. I’d love to switch to plant-based alternatives if it was worth it for me.

If you want to know more, the best source I’ve found is the Freakonomics podcast:

The Future of Meat (Ep. 367)

Global demand for beef, chicken, and pork continues to rise. So do concerns about environmental and other costs …

The average American consumes roughly 200 pounds of meat a year. …

The meat industry is massive and complicated — and often heavily subsidized. …

The agricultural historian James McWilliams, in a book called Just Food, argues that “every environmental problem related to contemporary agriculture … ends up having its deepest roots in meat production: monocropping, excessive applications of nitrogen fertilizer, addiction to insecticides, rain-forest depletion, land degradation, topsoil runoff, declining water supplies, even global warming — all these problems would be considerably less severe” if people ate meat “rarely, if ever.” …

The United States Cattlemen’s Association welcomes the competition. More food choices are good for consumers. But they want to be sure that labeling is accurate; that  “beef” or “meat” means the product came from a walking, belching cow.

They note that Almond milk is not milk. It should be called Almond beverage.

 

The Rooster Bar by Grisham

Rooster Bar (2017) is the 25th legal thriller novel by John Grisham.

Grisham was inspired to create the story after reading an article entitled “The Law-School Scam” that appeared in The Atlantic magazine in 2014. …

I continue to be impressed with Grisham. He’s getting better as an author.

This entertaining and unpredictable plot touches on many current topics including:

  • Law School diploma mills
  • American student debt
  • Medical malpractice
  • U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE)
  • Corruption in Sengal

In the novel the fictional law school is based on REAL for profits like the Florida Coastal School of Law, part of the InfiLaw System of law schools owned by Sterling Partners.

Florida Coastal is ranked in the bottom 25% of U.S. law schools. About 35% of graduates — most with student debt of about $200k — found full-time long-term jobs practicing law within nine months of graduation.

Students should be very wary of signing on with InfiLaw.

Amazon

related – “The Law-School Scam,” by Paul Campos

No sympathy for Trump supporters

Here’s another article telling me I should be recognizing and caring about this Trump supporter as a human being.

But I don’t. He’s wrong. He’s unethical and immoral. If this farmer goes bankrupt due to Trump’s stupid trade war with China, he deserves it.

The same person votes against the social safety network he might one day need. You can’t fix stupid.