Stuttgart Animal Prison

Wilhelma is a zoologicalbotanical garden in Stuttgart  … around 11,500 animals from around the world …

I’ve got mixed feelings when visiting zoos. I’m ASSuming it’s worth locking up these bored inmates to bring attention to the survivors in the wild.

I found this zoo to be a bit cramped. And — like Europe — about 30% under renovation.

They do have two snow leopards.

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OK Greta — you win

I’m swearing off single use plastic Diet Coke.

Drinking sparkling water from a machine instead.

Like Greta on Facebook.

Disclaimer – my boycott ends next international flight

The Year of Less by Cait Flanders

Needless to say, I was attracted to this book because of my own philosophy of Voluntary Simplicity.

Less is more.

Cait was quite a normal person. In debt, like normal people. Her life cluttered with possessions she never used, like normal people.

How I Stopped Shopping, Gave Away My Belongings, and Discovered Life Is Worth More Than Anything You Can Buy in a Store

When Cait Flanders was in her early 20s, she found herself $23,000 in consumer debt. In order to turn her life around — and get out of debt — she set out on a mission to address some of the root causes of her over-consumption.

Flanders’ memoir, The Year of Less, documents how through a self-imposed shopping ban, cutting back on eating out and drinking and de-cluttering her life, she rediscovered happiness, health and financial security.

In her own words, Flanders explains how she changed her life and wrote The Year of Less. …

CBC

Amazon

Are you buying meatless meat?

Cows belch methane. They are a bigger environmental problem than pigs or chicken for that reason.

Personally I’m trying to eat less beef.  When the meatless meat came along, I rushed to try as many of those products as possible. There are two main companies out of the USA, so far.

      1. Beyond Meat
      2. Impossible Foods

So far I’m not buying their products in preference to meat. The meatless meats I’ve tried are equally good or worse, are more expensive, and are not much more healthy.

I’ll keep trying. Both companies are still changing their products to better compete. Both are now very well funded. I’d love to switch to plant-based alternatives if it was worth it for me.

If you want to know more, the best source I’ve found is the Freakonomics podcast:

The Future of Meat (Ep. 367)

Global demand for beef, chicken, and pork continues to rise. So do concerns about environmental and other costs …

The average American consumes roughly 200 pounds of meat a year. …

The meat industry is massive and complicated — and often heavily subsidized. …

The agricultural historian James McWilliams, in a book called Just Food, argues that “every environmental problem related to contemporary agriculture … ends up having its deepest roots in meat production: monocropping, excessive applications of nitrogen fertilizer, addiction to insecticides, rain-forest depletion, land degradation, topsoil runoff, declining water supplies, even global warming — all these problems would be considerably less severe” if people ate meat “rarely, if ever.” …

The United States Cattlemen’s Association welcomes the competition. More food choices are good for consumers. But they want to be sure that labeling is accurate; that  “beef” or “meat” means the product came from a walking, belching cow.

They note that Almond milk is not milk. It should be called Almond beverage.