Listen to Elon

I’m often critical of Elon Musk. Turned off by his egomania.

Disappointed in his juvenile comments from the bully pulpit of Twitter. One of the richest and most powerful men in the world attacking and mocking people who are unable to fight back.

I’m disappointed that a guy who claims he doesn’t care about money is so reluctant to pay more in taxes though his businesses have received billions of dollars in tax subsidies.

That said, I admire almost everything else. His work ethic. His companies, especially Boring and Starlink.

Elon Musk does much more good for the world than bad. He’s scientific and well aware of the risks of climate change. He calls for a carbon tax. Musk endorsed Andrew Yang and expressed support for his proposed universal basic income.

Though the headlines shout that Elon is a “free speech absolutist”, Musk himself says Twitter must abide by the laws of each nation. I doubt much will change in terms of Twitter policy in Canada or the USA.

In fact, I’m guessing Twitter will be better for me with Musk as owner.

Warren had me watch this recent interview. Elon defends his life and ethics quite well.

Click PLAY or watch it on YouTube.

WOW – Don’t Look Up

I rejoined Netflix mainly to watch Don’t Look Up.

Brilliant.

Be sure to watch the credits. There are 3 endings.

Satire that reminded me of both Swift’s A Modest Proposal and Wag the Dog.

Something between a star-studded Hollywood blockbuster and an amateur YouTube documentary. Very original editing.

You’ve never seen DiCaprio like this. He had a lot of input on the script.

The cast is great. Best is Jonah Hill who plays a Don Jr. idiot appointed by his mother as the insanely unqualified  Chief of Staff.

The Republican tribe is urged to NOT LOOK UP at the planet busting comet. And deny what they can see with their own eyes. 😀 It parallels the American idiocracy of covid denial, for example. Apathy, incompetence and self-interest.

Denial of science.

It’s certain ReTrumplicans will hate this film.

This movie came from my burgeoning terror about the climate crisis and the fact that we live in a society that tends to place it as the fourth or fifth news story, or in some cases even deny that it’s happening, and how horrifying that is, but at the same time preposterously funny.[10]— Adam McKay, writer, director, and producer of Don’t Look Up

Lookout: Love, Solitude, and Searching for Wildfire by Trina Moyles  

Trina Moyles is a northern Alberta woman who decided to write a book about climate change and the resulting increase in forest fires.

Forest fires are one of the few outdoor “dangers” that truly worries me when hiking and cycling.

Over several 5-month summers alone in fire towers, it evolved into more of a life memoir.

And Trina has had a very interesting life.

While searching for smoke, Trina unravels under the pressure of a long-distance relationship–and a dawning awareness of the environmental crisis that climate change is producing in the boreal. Through megafires, lightning storms, and stunning encounters with wildlife, she learns to survive at the fire tower by forging deep connections with nature and with an extraordinary community of people dedicated to wildfire detection and combat. In isolation, she discovers a kind of self-awareness–and freedom–that only solitude can deliver.  …

Amazon

I learned a lot. And found the book very entertaining.

Canadian Geographic REVIEW.

Are you buying meatless meat?

Cows belch methane. They are a bigger environmental problem than pigs or chicken for that reason.

Personally I’m trying to eat less beef.  When the meatless meat came along, I rushed to try as many of those products as possible. There are two main companies out of the USA, so far.

      1. Beyond Meat
      2. Impossible Foods

So far I’m not buying their products in preference to meat. The meatless meats I’ve tried are equally good or worse, are more expensive, and are not much more healthy.

I’ll keep trying. Both companies are still changing their products to better compete. Both are now very well funded. I’d love to switch to plant-based alternatives if it was worth it for me.

If you want to know more, the best source I’ve found is the Freakonomics podcast:

The Future of Meat (Ep. 367)

Global demand for beef, chicken, and pork continues to rise. So do concerns about environmental and other costs …

The average American consumes roughly 200 pounds of meat a year. …

The meat industry is massive and complicated — and often heavily subsidized. …

The agricultural historian James McWilliams, in a book called Just Food, argues that “every environmental problem related to contemporary agriculture … ends up having its deepest roots in meat production: monocropping, excessive applications of nitrogen fertilizer, addiction to insecticides, rain-forest depletion, land degradation, topsoil runoff, declining water supplies, even global warming — all these problems would be considerably less severe” if people ate meat “rarely, if ever.” …

The United States Cattlemen’s Association welcomes the competition. More food choices are good for consumers. But they want to be sure that labeling is accurate; that  “beef” or “meat” means the product came from a walking, belching cow.

They note that Almond milk is not milk. It should be called Almond beverage.

 

Bikepacking Patagonia – day 15

Jan 28, 2019 – wild camp to La Junta (80km)

day 0 | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5/6 |7/8 | 9/10 | 11 | 12/13 | 14 | 15 | 16/17 | 18 | 19/20 | 21/23 end

It was another overcast / drizzly day.

I ended up cycling all day with only 1 major stop. I didn’t see any hiking trailheads through this section.

It’s difficult and costly to build & maintain trails in this impenetrable foliage.

The further I go south, the less the traffic.

The only memorable part of the day was visiting Villa Santa Lucia.

The town was devastated by a flood and mudslide on December 16, 2017. High tourist season.

21 people killed. 

The cause was heavy rainfall plus the detachment of a glacier.

Click PLAY or watch some of the mudslide on YouTube.

Here’s one house that has not yet been repaired in January 2019.

Sad.

But people are still rebuilding.

As it happens, a lot of cyclists stop at Villa Santa Lucia taking refuge from the rain by setting up tents under tarps.

I was happy to finally reach pretty La Junta (pop.914).

As rain and wind were still getting worse, I decided to get a room.

Lonely Planet and the tourist information kiosk recommended Hospedaje Tia Lety. It’s a homely, friendly place. But I left disappointed: wifi didn’t work; showers alternating from freezing to boiling.

As I couldn’t use the kitchen and was starving, I decided on the most decent looking restaurant in town.

I was the only customer at 8pm during high season. 🙄

Food was … OK.

But I did make some miles over the past 2 days.

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